Emergency Funds Offer $500 to Struggling Students

By Mark Gonzalez|October 9, 2017News, Top Stories|

Last year the District Student Council voted to increase the Student Activity Fee. One of the things they decided to do with the increased funds was to to create the Emergency Grant Fund; this program will help students experiencing a financial crisis. The Dean of Students’ Office will facilitate the dispersal of Emergency Loans. These are interest-free loans that need to be repaid by the 7th Monday of the term repayment will be automatically deducted from your disbursement. You can receive one loan per term and two loans per academic year, not to exceed four loans total while enrolled at PCC. Loans are authorized by the Deans of Student Development.

Emergency grants don’t need to be paid back at all. Students can receive one grant per term, three per academic year, and six total while enrolled at PCC.  Grants are authorized by the Associated Students of Portland Community College. (ASPCC) Each resource has their own guidelines for applying; the maximum money that can be given for both the grants and loans is $500. More information can be found on in the “Emergency Funds” section on the PCC Paying for College website. UPDATE 13 October:  Emergency Grant program over for Fall term, as all funds have been expended.  They will be available again Winter term.  Funds are still available for emergency loans.

ASPCC logoIn addition to the emergency funds, ASPCC has allocated resources to offer Child Care Subsidies for student parents at PCC. This program provides financial assistance for school-related child care expenses. Different campuses have different guidelines for applying; more information can be found in the “Child Care” section on the PCC Resources website.

For students struggling with hunger, there are also four “Panther Pantries” full of food for students in need. For students at Cascade Campus, the Pantry can be found in the Student Union Building, Second Floor, for students at Rock Creek: Building 5, Room 113, students at Southeast Campus: MTH 105, and for students at Sylvania: CC 102.

In an interview conducted by NPR, they spoke with Mark Milliron, co-founder and chief learning officer of Civitas Learning. Civitas Learning is a data analytics company that helps schools around the country get more students to graduation. “The number one reason students are leaving higher ed is logistics, not academics,” he said, using the example of Hurricane Harvey and the 70,000 Houston Community College Students that were affected by the tragedy. Big or small, even a simple car repair can be enough financial trouble to set back a student attempting to achieve a higher education.

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Mark Gonzalez

About Mark Gonzalez

My relationship with writing began in middle school. I'd write short stories or lines that would make people laugh or think for a bit; seeing their reactions never stopped making me smile. I spent most of my high school career discussing and arguing with classmates on political theory, while I spent after school hours arguing even more during mock trial club for competition prep. These experiences have helped me develop my voice as a writer, but I believe what truly inspired me to join the Bridge this 2017-2018 school year was the 2016 election. I have a dog named Mochi and live with my girlfriend here in Beaverton. Born in SoCal, but Oregon will always be my true home. I love biking, hiking, and reading whenever I have free time. Lately I've been reading Jacobin, Howard Zinn, and Need Vizzini. I'm studying Communications here at PCC and hoping to transfer to PSU in the future. My dream is to work hard and earn enough money or possibly find a scholarship towards journalism school. My dream career would be a new age media group such as The Young Turks or Vice network, and possibly being able to travel Latin America to learn more about my roots. I have a dog named Mochi and live with my girlfriend here in Beaverton. Born in So Cal, but Oregon will always be my true home. I love biking, hiking, and reading whenever I have free time. Lately I've been reading Jacobin, Howard Zinn, and Need Vizzini. I'm studying Communications here at PCC and hoping to transfer to PSU in the future. My dream is to work hard and earn enough money or possibly find a scholarship towards journalism school. My dream career would be a new age media group such as The Young Turks or Vice network, possibly being able to travel Latin America to learn more about my roots.