A Recent History of The Bridge

By Juan Lacayo|January 25, 2018Archive, Student Writing|

A Recent History of The Bridge
Juan Lacayo

PCC’s student newspaper, The Bridge, has a dramatic history that runs the gamut of critical acclaim, controversy, defunding, shutdown, and a subsequent revival:

Following budget cuts that occurred in 2005, The Bridge lost its administrative funding from the college’s general funds. As a result, that same year saw its shutdown. In 2011 the Committee on Student Leadership, an off-shoot of ASPCC/DSC, convened to examine four questions posed by then-President Preston Pulliams. The question that brought The Bridge back into the thoughts and conversations of students and administrators alike was “How might ASPCC also provide greater opportunities for students at large to participate and express their views in their forums and other venues?”

A 2011 survey circulated including questions regarding students’ opinions about: the importance of communication between the four campuses, and between the ASPCC/DSC and the students (84.5% ‘Strongly Agreed’ or ‘Agreed’); how likely they would use a student newspaper to keep up with college news (66%); and how likely they would use a [news]paper to “participate and express their views” (60%). This survey was created by ASPCC representatives with the assistance of Dr. David Rule, Dean Narcedalia Rodriguez, Dr. Ron Smith, and Dr. Michael Sonnleitner. PCC sociologist and instructor Ricci Franks, with the assistance of the college’s Department of Institutional Effectiveness, vetted the survey methodology and analyzed the 973 responses.

Student Doug Taylor used part of his Honors Capstone to set the groundwork for an online version of The Bridge. After seven years without a student newspaper, PCC seemed on the brink of reestablishing, and consequently supporting, a forum for students’ voices to be heard.

With just $7,000 from the DSC (a fraction of the budget from 1981, which received $26,000 just in ad revenues), The Bridge was set to host its articles on a WordPress website and hire one student editor from each campus. The money was enough to grant each editor 5 hours of work per week, cover the $600 annual subscription fee for the site, and to run the paper for the Fall-Spring terms. Tony Greiner, a Cascade campus librarian, was the sole volunteer for the faculty advisor position.

 

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Juan Lacayo

About Juan Lacayo

It’s difficult to describe my academic path because I haven’t figured out how to merge my interests into a degree program. I’m currently enrolled in the Multimedia Studies program in the hopes that I can gain the skills to cobble together a career with a Vice News or Radiolab type of organization as a storyteller. My interests include: music (jazz, electronic, hip hop, etc.), cinema, reading deviant or counterculture literature, comedy, social justice, and attempting to understand cultural and individual idiosyncrasies. My passions include: writing fiction, riding and working on bikes, and capturing the world through the “Juan” filter. I’m one of the lead bakers with Blue Star Donuts, which means that I have my hands in just about everything on the production side of the operation. On any given day, I could be making the dough, rolling out and cutting doughnuts, frying and finishing doughnuts, or making the magical potions that comprise our glazes, garnishes, and fillings. This type of position suits me, as I fancy myself a Jack-of-all-Trades, and I like to keep busy. Whatever I’m involved in, I like to have a hand in as many things as my expertise will allow. I love learning new things.