Multicultural Center Features Short Films on the American Holocaust of Native American Indians

By Bridge Staff|October 12, 2015Announcements, Southeast|

Hello Southeast,
Here’s the list of our short films for this term.  Hope you can join us and invite students and community every Thursday from 3pm to 4pm at the SE Multicultural Center!
American Holocaust of Native American Indians
Join us also for live drumming and art gifts.

Oct 15: Bad Sugar (Episode 4 of the documentary Unnatural Causes… is inequality making us sick?)
The Pima and Tohono O’odham Indians of southern Arizona have arguably the highest diabetes rates in the world – half of all adults are afflicted. But a century ago, diabetes was virtually unknown here.
Oct. 22: Not Just a Paycheck (Episode 7 of the documentary Unnatural Causes… is inequality making us sick?)
When a Swedish-owned company closed manufacturing plants in Greenville, Michigan, and Vastervik, Sweden, why did the health of Greenville residents quickly deteriorate while health outcomes in Vastervik remained steady?
Oct. 29:  WORKSHOP: Dating: Getting the relationship you want (an event of the WRC in partnership with the Multicultural Center and Queer Resources from to 2pm to 4pm)
Nov. 5Collateral Damage (Episode 6 of the documentary Unnatural Causes… is inequality making us sick?)
The lives and health of Marshall Islanders in the equatorial Pacific were disrupted in a unique fashion when the United States occupied their nation and used their outer islands for extensive nuclear testing.
Nov. 12:  When the Bough Breaks (Episode 2 of the documentary Unnatural Causes… is inequality making us sick?)
The number of infants who die before their first birthday is much higher in the U.S. than in other countries. And for African Americans the rate is nearly twice as high as for white Americans.
Nov. 19: Becoming American (Episode 3 of the documentary Unnatural Causes… is inequality making us sick?)
Recent Mexican immigrants, although poorer, tend to be healthier than the average American. They have lower rates of death, heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses, despite being less educated, earning less and having the stress of adapting to a new country and a new language. In research circles, this is the Latino paradox.  But as they are here longer, their health advantage erodes.
Dec 3: Remembering and Deconstructing Schoolhouse Rock!
This popular show educated and mis-educated millions of Americans from 1973 to 1985 and 1993 to 1999!
Saludos,
Rut
Rut Martínez-Alicea,

 Multicultural Center Coordinator
Portland Community College, Southeast Campus

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